Films for the Future advocating for environmental change in the present

May 25, 2018

 Films for the Future advocating for environmental change in the present

Biodegradable gardening skills are being taught at a Films for the Future event. Photo: Supplied

A film series that advocates for environmental change is inspiring Aucklander’s to learn about regenerative gardening techniques.

Hosted by For the Love of Bees in collaboration with Live Lightly and Ellen Melville Centre, Films for the Future: A Hopeful Film Series project has been running once a month since March and will continue for the rest of the year.

The event offers the public a chance to learn skills from local growers and advocates as well as a screening of a film with a complimentary meal from Live Lightly.

Sarah Smuts-Kennedy, Vision Holder of For the Love of Bees, says the series hopes to encourage the community to use their imagination to create a community they want to live in.

“It is taking the amazing work that’s been done by these amazing documentary makers and the subjects of the film and bringing that breadth of knowledge into our community,” she says.

Ms Smuts-Kennedy says For the Love of Bees decided to host the event to encourage the public to invent a solution for their own environmental goals and share it with others.

“We have specifically structured the evenings so people can learn about concepts that are already being activated by someone in their community so they can become part of the process that transforms their city,” she says.

The films so far have educated the public on the importance of seeds, building compost and biological gardening, saving organic tomato and bean seeds and using a new compost dating app called Share Waste.

Lily Hirsch, originator of the idea of Films for the Future: A Hopeful Film Series project, says the important thing about it is that people can learn and take away new ideas.

“People don’t have to agree with the ideas but it’s a way of broadening people’s minds,” she says.

Biodynamic grower, Allen Gorthy, who spoke at the third round of Films for the Future says it is very important to learn about biodynamics in New Zealand now more than ever.

“Water is a huge issue and is not getting enough support. If it continues to be polluted by cow manure and other substances, then we are working with a broken system in terms of making biodynamics work,” he says.

Mr Gorthy says anyone can grow a biodynamic garden using practices including Cow Pat Pit compost.

“I want the public to have fun with it and not be scared they are doing it wrong. Biodynamics teaches you the process is the most important part of the final product and you shouldn’t fear just having a play around and learning from your mistakes,” he says.

The next Films for the Future event will take place on June 16, that will focus on reducing food waste.

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