Retiree hops on to hear Gareth Morgan’s vision for NZ

May 3, 2017

Retiree hops on to hear Gareth Morgan’s vision for NZ

Gareth Morgan speaks to a receptive crowd in Auckland. Photo: Sarah Downs

Bill Jaques, 78, used his SuperGold Card to hear Gareth Morgan talk in Auckland yesterday.

The free ride is something The Opportunities Party (TOP) leader objects to, but Mr Jaques wanted to hear what Mr Morgan had to say as part of his nationwide tour.

The party held its Auckland Central roadshow at AUT University last night.

Mr Jaques, who traditionally aligns with the right, was one of a crowd of about 50 people, who were warmed up by a few motorcycle jokes and then taken through some of the party's seven key policies.

Mr Morgan shared his “sense of frustration” with current politics and his new stint at “throwing a few marbles across the dance floor”.

He wanted all New Zealanders to “get a fair go”, and this included introducing “a fairer tax system”, a “smarter immigration system” and helping “struggling families”.

Our lack of taxation is “repulsive”, said Mr Morgan, and TOP’s tax reform polices want to fix inequality and make sure “all income from capital pay a little tax”.

TOP would also collect more tax from foreign firms on business doing New Zealand and from foreigners buying land.

Mr Morgan said next year he and his wife would qualify for superannuation, and would get about $40,000 a year.

“I don't need a cent of it. It’s stark raving mad.”

“There’s a popular misconception that the older generation are all about greed and it’s just rubbish.”

Mr Morgan took questions from the audience on waterways, health and education – no mention of cats.

“Ninety per cent of our teaching is done for the vanity of the parents,” said Mr Morgan who wanted to see less testing and more teaching.

“Our kids need to learn how to problem solve.”

TOP is proposing free high quality education for three to four year olds.

Mr Jaques agreed with Mr Morgan’s slash on super and said the party’s policies could be worth listening to.

“I’m very concerned about the inequality issue.

“Inequality is a cancer that is undermining the cohesion of our society.

“A lot of people do share his views and he may be able to gather people from right of centre.”

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